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. president obama has issued 23 executive actions on gun violence. can you discuss the commonality between your organization, the nra, and the obama administration when it comes to finding ways to reduce gun violence? >> what we think works, and we support what works. i've talked about the eagle child safety program which would put more money into than anybody in the country. we support enforcing the federal gun laws on the books were under% of the time against drug -- 100% of the time against drug dealers, gangs with guns, felons with guns, and that works. you've got states like california where they send more inmates back to the streets and have to put more back in jail for new crimes guns -- committed against their citizens than any other state in the nation. new york state, too. the collapse of the fiscal situation in those states has also collapsed the criminal justice system in those states. the nra has always supported what works. we have 11,000 police instructors and we represent honest people all over this country. there are 25,000 violent crimes per week in this country. the inno
issue was obama, was the increase in spending, was essentially the expansion of government. or to put it a more abstract and grand way, the relationship between citizen and state which obviously was tilting towards state. so -- and there when the question is put in that way, the country shows itself to be a center-right country. had republicans been able to duplicate those conditions, that framework in 2012, they would have won. but it isn't the same election. 2010 was almost a purely ideological election, perhaps the most ideological since 1980. then you get to 2010 when you have a personality involved, and you have a figure who represents one side. romney is a good man. i like him. i think he's an honorable man. and i think he actually would have made an excellent president but he was a bad candidate, particularly in an election that could have been won had it been an election about ideas and philosophy. i think it would have been easily won had it been about ideas and philosophy. but number one, he wasn't the man, the best man on our side to make that case. and secondly, he decided
unexpectedly tough talk by president obama last week on the issue of climate change. i want to start by showing our viewers what exactly the president had to say. >> we will respond to climate change knowing that the failure to do so would fail our children and future generations. some may deny the overwhelming judgment of science but none can avoid raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot seed to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industry, we must climbs it's promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure. a forrest in water ways, our crop land and snow cappedpeeks. that is how we will preserve our planet, command it to our god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed of fathers once declired. >> a lot of time spent on the issue of climate change in that speesh. was it a surprise to folks in the environmental community? >> i think they expected a shout out
be made the president obama won a second term on social issues. what we have been served better if the discussions during these debates centered more on the economy? >> i do think, in the end, this one came down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as sort of a guidepost for where he wants to go from here -- i did not hear him talk a lot about, during the campaign, he seemed to be talking about jobs and getting people back to work. i think the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think he thought -- that his people thought that they had -- what they concentrated on -- in some ways this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters through polls and recognizing that the demographic in this country where changing demographic -- were changing dramatically. the republicans
obama called secretary panetta before the news briefing and they issued a statement reading in part "today, by moving to open more military positions -- including ground combat units -- to women, our armed forces have taken another historic step to toward harning the atlantas and skills of all our military personnel ." throughing or rethroughing a ban on military-style sexual weapons and high-capacity magazines. joining some members of congress, law enforcement officials and members of gun safety organizations. this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> i want to thank all of you for coming today and i want to welcome you. this is a tough battle, so welcome. i'm pleased to be joined this morning by a cross section of americans who have been affected by gun violence. we have with us today, police chiefs, mayors, teachers, doctors, members of the clergy, mothers, gun safety groups, victims of gun violence and many others who care deeply about this issue. i would really like to thank my colleagues in the senate and the house who have chosen to stand together on this important issue. some of us
common ground. president obama has made immigration reform a top priority. it is my top priority. i am committed to getting this bipartisan issue that we now have before us over the finish line. poll after poll shows americans, democrats, republicans, and support ours solution. and a president who is eager to solve this problem. there is no reason you should not get this done as soon as possible. our economy requires a solution. families across america are praying for a solution. that is the truth. >> thank you. since we came to the senate, 16 years ago, i have been working on the immigration issue. i have never felt more positive about the prospects of immigration reform than i do today. some significant things have occurred right here in this room this week. a bipartisan group of senators, my colleague, senator mccain, as well as two others in support, they have all step forward with a set of principles we think will guide us to fixing this broken immigration system and america. you are not privy to what is going on in " -- behind closed doors. i have been heartened. we tackled sever
fundamental issues in american history and politics and one that gets talked about much less than it should. that is race in america. a few days ago, president barack obama put its hand on the lincoln and martin luther king bible and took the oath of office almost 150 years since the emancipation population went into effect. he talked about the country's historic and continuing march for greater freedom. we at the "washington monthly" found it appropriate to devote the subjects to the conditions of minorities in america today. president obama as measured by his november vote totals retained the support of the americans of color, neither he nor the country have talked about much of race. he mentioned race fewer times in his first two years than any democrat resident since 1961. when he did talk about race, it often provoked a fierce backlash as when he said last year that if he had a son, he would look like trayvon martin, the young man who was killed tragedy in florida. tremendous backlash to that. he went silent on that issue. there has been generally a politically imposed code of silence
by senator hagel seemed to imply a willingness to talk to iran on some issues that i believe most of us would view as non-negotiable, and any willingness to talk to iran would need to be highly conditional. toator hagel's reassurance me and my office that he supports the obama administration's strong stance against iran is significant. we look forward to hearing senator hagel today in some depth on that subject. we will also be interested in hearing senator hagel's statement on the public statements is made on israel and the united states, that our policy of non-engagement with the syrians as, "isolated us more than the syrians," and a 2009 statement that "we should not isolate hamas," a terrorist organization. there is much to be explored at this hearing. but as we struggle with the difficult security challenges facing our nation, the president needs to have a secretary of defense in whom he has trust, who will give him unvarnished advice, a person of integrity, and one who has a personal understanding of the consequences of decisions relative to the use of military force. senator hagel cert
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)